Publikationen

Stand: Juli 2015

Die folgende Liste beinhaltet nur die Publikationen, welche Daten beinhalten, die das Wolfgang-Köhler-Primatenforschungszentrum gesammelt hat.

2015

Bräuer, J., & Call, J. (2015). Apes produce tools for future use. American Journal of Primatology, 77(3), 254-263. doi:10.1002/ajp.22341.

Close, J., & Call, J. (2015). From colour photographs to black-and-white line drawings: An assessment of chimpanzees' (Pan troglodytes') transfer behaviour. Animal Cognition, 18(2), 437-449. doi:10.1007/s10071-014-0813-5.

Engelmann, J. M., Herrmann, E., & Tomasello, M. (2015). Chimpanzees trust conspecifics to engage in low-cost reciprocity (advance online). Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 282(1802): 20142803. doi:10.1098/rspb.2014.2803.

Marín Manrique, H., & Call, J. (2015). Age-dependent cognitive inflexibility in great apes. Animal Behaviour, 102, 1-6. doi:10.1016/j.anbehav.2015.01.002.

Völter, C. J., Rossano, F., & Call, J. (2015). From exploitation to cooperation: social tool use in orang-utan mother–offspring dyads. Animal Behaviour, 100, 126-134. doi:10.1016/j.anbehav.2014.11.025.


2014

Albiach-Serrano, A., & Call, J. (2014). A reversed-reward contingency task reveals causal knowledge in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). Animal cognition (online first). [pdf]

Albiach-Serrano, A., Call, J., & Tomasello, M. (2014). Do chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) help conspecifics to obtain food? Folia Primatologica, 85(1), 45-46. doi:10.1159/000357512.

Amici, F., Aureli, F., & Call, J. (2014). Response facilitation in the four great apes: is there a role for empathy? Primates, 55(1), 113–118. [pdf]

Amici, F., Aureli, F., Mundry, R., Sánchez Amaro, A., Mesa Barroso, A., Ferretti, J., & Call, J. (2014). Calculated reciprocity? A comparative test with six primate species. Primates (online first). [pdf]

Amici, F., Visalberghi, E., & Call, J. (2014). Lack of prosociality in great apes, capuchin monkeys and spider monkeys: Convergent evidence from two different food distribution tasks. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 281(1793): 20141699. doi:10.1098/rspb.2014.1699.

Bourjade, M., Call, J., Pelé, M., Maumy, M., & Dufour, V. (2014). Bonobos and orangutans, but not chimpanzees, flexibly plan for the future in a token-exchange task. Animal Cognition, 17(6), 1329-1340. doi:10.1007/s10071-014-0768-6.

Bozek,K., Wei, Y., Yan, Z., Liu, X., Xiong, J., Sugimoto, M., Tomita, M., Pääbo, S., Pieszek, R., Sherwood, C.C. , Hof, P. R, Ely J. J. , Steinhauser, D., Willmitzer, L., Bangsbo, J., Hansson, Ola, Call, J., Giavalisco, P., & Khaitovich, P. (2014). Exceptional Evolutionary Divergence of Human Muscle and Brain Metabolomes Parallels Human Cognitive and Physical Uniqueness. PLoS Biology, 12(5): 001871. [pdf]

Bräuer, J., & Call, J. (2015). Apes produce tools for future use. American Journal of Primatology, 77(3), 254-263. doi:10.1002/ajp.22341.

Bullinger, A., Melis. A., & Tomasello, M. (2014). Chimpanzees instrumentally help but do not communicate in a mutualistic cooperative task. Journal of Comparative Psychology, 128(3), 251-260.

Cacchione, T., Hrubesch, C., & Call, J. (2014). Apes’ tracking of objects and collections. Swiss Journal of Psychology, 73(1), 47–52. [pdf]

Cacchione, T., Hrubesch, C., & Call, J. (2014). Phylogenetic roots of quantity processing: Apes do not rely on object indexing to process quantities. Cognitive Development, 31, 79-95. doi:10.1016/j.cogdev.2014.04.002.

Call, J. (2014). Why do apes cooperate? Folia Primatologica, 85(1), 43-43. doi:10.1159/000357512.

Duguid, S., Wyman, E., Bullinger, A. F., Herfurth-Majstorovic, K., & Tomasello, M. (2014). Coordination strategies of chimpanzees and human children in a Stag Hunt game. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 281(1796): 20141973. doi:10.1098/rspb.2014.1973.

Hanus, D., & Call, J. (2014). When maths trumps logic: Probabilistic judgements in chimpanzees.Biology Letters, 10(12): 20140892. doi:10.1098/rsbl.2014.0892.

Haun, D., & Tomasello, M. (2014). Children conform to the behavior of peers; other great apes stick with what they know. Psychological Science (advance online).

Hribar, A., Sonesson, G. & Call, J. (2014).  From sign to action. Studies in chimpanzee pictorial competence. Semiotica, 198, 205–240. [pdf]

Jorden, F.M., van Schaik, C., François, P., Gintis, H., Haun, D.B.M., Hruschka, D.H., Janssen, M.A.,  Kitts, J.A., Lehmann, L., Mathew, S., Richerson, P.J., Turchin, P., Wiessner, P. (2014).

Kano, F. & Call, J. (2014). Cross-species variation of gaze following and conspecific preference among great apes, human infants and adults. Animal Behaviour, 91, 137–150. [pdf]

Kano, F. & Call, J. (2014). Great apes generate goal-based action prediction: An eye-tracking study. Psychological Science (online first)

Karg, K., Schmelz, M., Call, J., & Tomasello, M. (2014). All Great Ape Species (Gorilla gorilla, Pan paniscus, P. troglodytes, Pongo abelii) and 2½-Year-Old Children (Homo sapiens) Discriminate Appearance from Reality. Journal of Comparative Psychology, 128(4), 431-439.

Liebal, K., Vaish, A., Haun, D., & Tomasello, M. (2014). Does sympathy motivate prosocial behavior in great apes? PLoS One 9(1): e84299. [pdf]

Martin-Ordas, G., Atance, C.M., & Call, J. (2014).  Remembering in tool-use tasks in children and apes: The role of the information at encoding. Memory, 22(1), 129–144.

Mayer, C., Call, J., Albiach-Serrano, A., Visalberghi, E., Sabbatini, G., & Seed, A. (2014). Abstract knowledge in the broken-string problem: Evidence from nonhuman primates and pre-schoolers. PLoS One, 9(10): e108597. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0108597.

Mendes, N. & Call, J. (2014).  Chimpanzees form long-term memories for food locations after limited exposure.  American Journal of Primatology, 76(5), 485–495. [pdf]

Pele, M., Broihanne, M.H., Thierry, B., Call, J., & Dufour, V. (2014).  To bet or not to bet? Decision-making under risk in nonhuman primates.  Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, 49, 141-166.

Rakoczy, H., Cluever, A., Saucke, L., Stoffregen, N., Grabener, A., Migura, J., & Call, J. (2014). Apes are intuitive statisticians. Cognition, 131(1), 60–68.

Salas, L., Palacios-Huerta, I., & Call, J. (2014). Intertemporal preferences in great apes.Folia Primatologica, 85(1), 56-57. doi:10.1159/000357512.

Sanchez-Amaro, A., Peretó, M., Colell, M., & Call, J. (2014). Natural choices of food in chimpanzees and orangutans.Folia Primatologica, 85(1), 57-57. doi:10.1159/000357512.

van der Goot, M., & Tomasello, M., & Liszkowski, U. (2014). Differences in the nonverbal requests of great apes and human infants. Child Development, 85(2), 444–455. [pdf]

Van Leeuwen, E. J. C., Call, J., & Haun, D. (2014). Human children rely more on social information than chimpanzees do.Biology Letters, 10(11): 20140487. doi:10.1098/rsbl.2014.0487.

Völter, C. J., & Call, J. (2014). Great apes (Pan paniscus, Pan troglodytes, Gorilla gorilla, Pongo abelii) follow visual trails to locate hidden food. Journal of Comparative Psychology, 128(2), 199-208. [pdf]

Völter C. & Call J. (2014). Great Apes (Pan paniscus, Pan troglodytes, Gorilla gorilla, Pongo abelii) Follow Visual Trails to Locate Hidden Food. Journal of Comparative Psychology 128(2), 199–208.

Völter C. & Call J. (2014). The Cognitive Underpinnings of Flexible Tool Use in Great Apes. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Learning and Cognition (online first).

Völter C. & Call J. (2014). Younger apes and human children plan their moves in a maze task. Cognition 130(2), 186–203.

Waller, B. M., Misch, A., Whitehouse, J., & Herrmann, E. (2014). Children, but not chimpanzees, have facial correlates of determination. Biology Letters, 10, 20130974. [pdf]



 

2013

Allritz, M., Tennie, C. & Call, J., (2013).  Food washing and placer mining in captive great apes.  Primates, 54(4), 361–370.

Bullinger, A.F., Burkart, M., Melis, A.P., & Tomasello, M. (2013). Bonobos, Pan paniscus, chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes, and marmosets, Callithrix jacchus, prefer to feed alone. Animal Behaviour, 85(1), 51–60. [pdf]

Buttelmann, D., Carpenter, M., Call, J., & Tomasello, M. (2013). Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) recognize successful actions, but fail to imitate them. Animal Behaviour, 86(4), 755–761. [pdf]

Cacchione, T., Hrubesch, C., & Call, J. (2013).  Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and bonobos (Pan paniscus) quantify split solid objects. Animal Cognition 16(1), 1–10. [pdf]

Carpenter, M., & Call, J. (2013). How joint is the joint attention of apes and human infants? In J. Metcalfe, & H. S. Terrace (Eds.), Agency and joint attention (pp. 49-61). New York: Oxford University Press.

Halina, M., Rossano, F., & Tomasello, M. (2013). The ontogenetic ritualization of bonobo gestures. Animal Cognition, 16(4), 653–666. [pdf]

Herrmann, E., Keupp, S., Hare, B., Vaish, A., & Tomasello, M. (2013). Direct and indirect reputation formation in non-human great apes (Pan paniscus, Pan troglodytes, Gorilla gorilla, Pongo pygmaeus) and human children (Homo sapiens). Journal of Comparative Psychology, 127(1), 63–75. [pdf]

Jensen, K., Call, J., & Tomasello, M. (2013). Chimpanzee responders still behave like rational maximizers. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 110(20), E1837. [pdf]

Manrique H.M., Völter C.J., & Call J. (2013). Repeated innovation in great apes. Animal Behaviour 85(1), 195–202.

Martin-Ordas, G. & Call, J. (2013).  Episodic memory:  A comparative approach.  Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, 7, article 63 [pdf]

Menzel, C., Fowler, A., Tennie, C. & Call, J. (2013).  Leaf surface roughness elicits leaf swallowing behavior in Captive Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and Bonobos (P. paniscus), but not in Gorillas (Gorilla gorilla) or Orangutans (Pongo abelii).  International Journal of Primatology, 34(3), 533-553. [pdf]

Moore, R. (2013). Social learning  and Teaching in chimpanzees. Biology and Philosophy, 28(6), 879–901. [pdf]

Moore, R. (2013). Evidence and interpretation in great ape gestural communication. In M. L. Cappuccio (Ed.), Pointing: Where Embodied Cognition Meets the Symbolic Mind. HumanaMente, 24(1). Pisa: ETS, 27–51.

Rossano, F. (2013). Sequence organization and timing of bonobo mother-infant interactions. Interaction Studies, 142, 160–189. [pdf]

Schmelz, M., Call, J., & Tomasello, M. (2013).  Chimpanzees predict that a competitor's preference will match their own. Biology Letters 9(1): 20120829. [pdf]

Schmitt, V., Kröger, I., Zinner, D., Call, J., & Fischer, J. (2013). Monkeys perform as well as apes and humans in a size discrimination task. Animal Cognition, 16, 829–838. [pdf]

van Leeuwen, E. J. C., Cronin, K. A., Schütte, S., Call, J., & Haun, D. B. M. (2013). Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) flexibly adjust their behaviour in order to maximize payoffs, not to conform to majorities. PLoS One, 8(11): e80945. [pdf]


2012


Albiach-Serrano, A., Bugnyar, T., & Call, J. (2012).  Apes (Gorilla Gorilla, Pan paniscus, P. troglodytes, Pongo abelii) vs. corvids (Corvus corax, C. corone) in a support task:  The effect of pattern and functionality. Journal of Comparative Psychology, 126(4), 355–367. [pdf]

Amici, F., Call, J., & Aureli, F. (2012). Aversion to violation of expectations of food distribution: The role of social tolerance and relative dominance in seven primate species. Behaviour, 149(3–4), 345–368.

Amici, F., Barney, B., Johnson, V. E., Call, J., & Aureli, F. (2012). A modular mind? A test using individual data from seven primate species. PLoS One, 7(12): e51918.

Buttelmann, D., Schütte, S., Carpenter, M., Call, J., & Tomasello, M. (2012).  Great apes infer others’ goals based on context. Animal Cognition, 15(6), 1037–1053. [pdf]

Engelmann, J. M., Herrmann, E., & Tomasello, M. (2012). Five-year olds, but not chimpanzees, attempt to manage their reputations. PLoS ONE 7(10): e48433. [pdf]

Fletcher, G., Warneken, F., & Tomasello, M. (2012). Differences in cognitive processes underlying the collaborative activities of children and chimpanzees. Cognitive Development, 27(2), 136–153. [pdf]

Herrmann, E., & Call, J. (2012).  Are there geniuses among the apes?  Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society London B (Biological Sciences), 367(1603), 2753–2761. [pdf]  

Kaiser, I., Jensen, K., Call, J., & Tomasello, M. (2012).  Theft in an ultimatum game: chimpanzees and bonobos are insensitive to unfairness.  Biology Letters, 8(6), 942–945.
[pdf]  

Kano, F., Call, J., & Tomonaga, M. (2012).  Face and eye scanning in gorillas (Gorilla gorilla), orangutans (Pongo abelii), and humans (Homo sapiens): Unique eye-viewing patterns in humans among hominids. Journal of Comparative Psychology, 126(4), 388–398. [pdf

Kirchhofer, K., Zimmermann, F., Kaminski, J., & Tomasello, M. (2012). Dogs (Canis familiaris), but not chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), understand imperative pointing. PLoS One, 7(2): e30913. [pdf]

Luef, E. M., & Liebal, K. (2012). Infant-directed communication in lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla): Do older animals scaffold communicative competence in infants? American Journal of Primatology, 74(9), 841–852..

Martin Ordas, G., Schumacher, L., & Call, J. (2012). Sequential tool use in great apes. PLoS One, 7(12): e52074. [pdf]

Martin-Ordas, G., Jaek, F., & Call, J. (2012).  Barriers and traps: Great apes' performance in two functionally equivalent tasks.  Animal Cognition, 15(5), 1007–1013. [pdf

Riedl, K., Jensen, K., Call, J., & Tomasello, M. (2012).  No third-party punishment in chimpanzees. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, 109(37), 14824–14829. [pdf]

Sabbatini, G., Truppa, V., Hribar, A., Call, J., & Visalberghi, E. (2012). Understanding the functional properties of tools: chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) attend to tool features differently. Animal Cognition, 15(4), 577–590. [pdf]

Schneider, A.-C., Melis, A. P., &  Tomasello, M. (2012). How chimpanzees solve collective action problems. Proceeding of the Royal Society B (Biological Sciences), 279(1749), 4946–4954. [pdf]

Schneider, C., Call, J., & Liebal, K. (2012).  Onset and early use of gestural communication in nonhuman great apes. American Journal of Primatology, 74(2), 102–113. [pdf]

Schneider, C., Call, J., & Liebal, K. (2012).  What role do mothers play in the gestural acquisition of Bonobos (Pan paniscus) and Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)? International Journal of Primatology, 33(1), 246–262. [pdf]

Seed, A., Seddon, E., Greene, B., & Call, J. (2012).  Chimpanzee 'folk physics':  Bringing failures into focus. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society London B (Biological Sciences), 367(1603), 2743–2752. [pdf]  

Völter C., & Call J. (2012) Problem solving in great apes (Pan paniscus, Pan troglodytes, Gorilla gorilla, and Pongo abelii): The effect of visual feedback. Animal Cognition 15(5), 923–936. [pdf]


2011


Bräuer, J. & Call, J. (2011). The Magic Cup: Great Apes and Domestic Dogs (Canis familiaris) individuate Objects According to their Properties. Journal of Comparative Psychology. Vol. 125, No. 3, 353–361 [pdf]

Bullinger, A. F., Zimmermann, F., Kaminski, J. & Tomasello, M. (2011). Different Social Motives in the Gestural Communication of Chimpanzees and Human Children. Developmental Science, 14:1 , pp 58–68. [pdf]

Bullinger, A.F., Wyman, E., Melis, A.P., & Tomasello, M. (2011). Coordination of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) in a stag hunt game. International Journal of Primatology, 32(6), 1296-1310. [pdf]

Hamann, K., Warneken, F., Greenberg, J., & Tomasello, M. (2011). Collaboration encourages equal sharing in children but not chimpanzees. Nature, 476, 328-331. [pdf]

Hanus, D., Call, J. (2011). Contrasting the use of causal and arbitrary cues in chimpanzee problem solving. Animal Cognition, 14: 871-878. [pdf]

Hanus, D., Mendes, N., Tennie, C., & Call, J. (2011). Comparing the performances of apes and humans in the floating peanut task. PLos ONE, e19555 [pdf]

Haun, D. B. M., Nawroth, C., & Call, J. (2011). Great apes' risk-taking strategies in a decision
making task. PLoS ONE, 6(12): e28801.

Herrmann, E., Hare, B., Cissewski, J., & Tomasello, M. (2011). A comparison of temperament in nonhuman apes and human infants. Developmental Science, 14(6), 1393-1405. [pdf]

Hribar, A. & Call, J. (2011).  Great apes use landmark cues over spatial relations to find hidden food.  Animal Cognition, 14, 623-635. DOI: 10.1007/s10071-011-0397-2 [pdf]

Hribar, A., Haun, D. & Call, J. (2011).  Great apes' strategies to map spatial relations.  Animal Cognition, 14, 511-523. [pdf]

Kanngiesser, P., Santos, L., Call, J. & Hood, B. (2011). The limits of endowment effects in great apes (Pan paniscus, Pan troglodytes, Gorilla gorilla, Pongo pygmaeus). Journal of Comparative Psychology, 125(4), 436-445. [pdf]

Kanngiesser, P., Sueur, C., Riedl, K., Grossmann, J., Call, J. (2011). Grooming network cohesion and the role of individuals in a captive chimpanzee group. American journal of primatology. 73(8):758-67 [pdf]

Kano, F., Hirata, S., Call, J. & Tomonaga, M. (2011).  The visual strategy specific to humans among hominids: A study using the gap-overlap paradigm.  Vision Research, 51(23-24), 2348-2355. [pdf]

Marín Manrique, H. & Call, J. (2011). Spontaneous use of tools as straws in great apes. Animal Cognition.14:213–226 [pdf]

Martin Ordas, G., & Call, J. (2011).  Memory processing in great apes: the effect of time and sleep. Biology Letters, 7(6), 829-832. [pdf]

Mendes, N., Rakoczy, H. & Call, J. (2011). Primates do not spontaneously use shape properties for object individuation: A competence or a performance problem? Animal Cognition. 14, 407-414 [pdf]

Schmelz, M., Call, J., & Tomasello, M. (2011). Chimpanzees know that others make inferences. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 108, 17284-17289. [pdf]

Schrauf, C. & Call, J. (2011). Great apes use weight as a cue to find hidden food. American Journal of Primatology. 73:323–334 [pdf]

Tempelmann, S., Kaminski, J., & Liebal, K. (2011). Focus on the essential: All great apes know when others are being attentive. Animal Cognition, 14(3), 433-439. [pdf]


2010


Albiach-Serrano, A., Call, J. & Barth, J. (2010). Great apes track hidden objects after changes in the objects' position and in subject's orientation. American Journal of Primatology, 72, 349-359. [pdf]

Amici, F., Call, J., & Aureli, F. (2010). Monkeys and apes: are their cognitive skills really so different? American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 143:188-197 [pdf]

Cacchione, T., & Call, J. (2010).  Intuitions about gravity and solidity in great apes: The tubes task.  Developmental Science, 12, 2, 320-330. [pdf]

Cacchione, T., & Call, J. (2010). Do gorillas (Gorilla gorilla) and orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) fail to represent objects in the context of cohesion violations? Cognition, 116, 193–203. [pdf]

Call, J. (2010). Do apes know that they can be wrong? Animal Cognition, 13, 689–700. [pdf]

Greenberg, J. R., Hamann, K., Warneken, F., & Tomasello, M. (2010). Chimpanzee helping in collaborative and non-collaborative contexts. Animal Behaviour, 80, 873–880. [pdf]

Kanngiesser, P. & Call, J. (2010). Bonobos, chimpanzees, gorillas, and orang utans use feature and spatial cues in two spatial memory tasks. Animal Cognition, 13, 419-430. [pdf]

Krachun, C., Carpenter, M., Call, J., & Tomasello, M. (2010). A new change-of-contents false belief test: Children and chimpanzees compared. International Journal of Comparative Psychology, 23, 145-165. [pdf]

Marín Manrique, H., Gross, A. N., & Call, J. (2010). Great apes select tools based on their rigidity. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes. 36(4), 409-22. [pdf]

Martin-Ordas, G., Haun, D., Colmenares, F. & Call, J. (2010). Keeping track of time: evidence for episodic-like memory in great apes. Animal Cognition, 13, 331-340. [pdf]

Potì, P., Kanngiesser, P., Saporiti, M., Amiconi, A., Bläsing, B. & Call, J. (2010). Searching in the middle – Capuchins' and Bonobos' behavior during a spatial search task. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes, 36, 92-109. [pdf]

Schneider, C., Call, J., & Liebal, K. (2010). Do bonobos say NO by shaking their head? Primates, 51(3), 199–202. [pdf]

Slocombe, K. E., Kaller, T., Call, J., & Zuberbühler, K. (2010). Chimpanzees extract social information from agonistic screams. PLoS ONE, 5(7), e11473. [pdf]

Tennie, C., Call, J., & Tomasello, M. (2010). Evidence for Emulation in Chimpanzees in Social Settings Using the Floating Peanut Task. PLoS ONE 5(5), e10544. [pdf]

Vlamings, P, Hare, B. Call, J. (2010). Reaching around barriers: The performance of the great apes and 3- to 5-year-old children. Animal Cognition, 13, 273-285. [pdf]


2009


Amici, F., Call, J., & Aureli, F. (2009).  Variation in withholding of information in three monkey species.  Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B, 276, 3311-3318. [pdf]

Amici, F., Call, J., Visalberghi, E., & Aureli, F. (2009).  Spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) and capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) follow gaze around barriers: evidence for perspective-taking? Journal of Comparative Psychology, 123, 4, 368-374. [pdf]

Bräuer, J., Call, J., & Tomasello, M. (2009). Are apes inequity averse? New data on the token-exchange paradigm. American Journal of Primatology 71, 175–181. [pdf]

Buttelmann, D., Call, J., & Tomasello, M. (2009) Do great apes use emotional expressions to infer desires? Developmental Science, 12, 5, 688-698. [pdf]

Cacchione, T., Call, J., & Zingg R. (2009). Gravity and solidity in four Great ape species (Gorilla gorilla, Pongo pygmaeus, Pan troglodytes, Pan paniscus): Vertical and horizontal variations of the table task.  Journal of Comparative Psychology, 123, 168–180. [pdf]

Dufour, V., Pelé, M., Neumann, M. Thierry, B., & Call, J. (2009).  Calculated reciprocity after all: computation behind token transfers in orangutans.  Biology Letters, 5, 172–175. [pdf]

Haun, D., & Call, J. (2009).  Great apes' capacities to recognize relational similarity. Cognition, 110, 147–159. [pdf]

Krachun, C., & Call, J. (2009).  Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) know what can be seen from where.  Animal Cognition, 12, 317–331. [pdf]

Krachun, C., Call, J., & Tomasello, M. (2009).  Can chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) discriminate appearance from reality? Cognition, 112, 435-450. [pdf]

Krachun, C., Carpenter, M., Call, J., & Tomasello, M. (2009).  A competitive nonverbal false belief task for children and apes.  Developmental Science, 12, 521–535. [pdf]

Liszkowski, U., Schäfer, M., Carpenter, M., & Tomasello, M. (2009). Prelinguistic infants, but not chimpanzees, communicate about absent entities. Psychological Science, 20, 654–660. [pdf]

Martin-Ordas, G., & Call, J. (2009).  Assessing generalization within and between trap tasks in the great apes.  International Journal of Comparative Psychology, 22, 43–60. [pdf]

Melis, A., Hare, B., & Tomasello, M. (2009). Chimpanzees coordinate in a negotiation game. Evolution and Human Behavior, 30, 381-392. [pdf]

Mulcahy, N. & Call, J. (2009). The performance of bonobos (Pan paniscus), chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) in two versions of an object choice task. Journal of Comparative Psychology, 123, 304-309. [pdf]

Pelé M., Dufour V., Thierry B., & Call J. (2009). Token transfers among great apes: species differences, gestural requests and reciprocal exchange.  Journal of Comparative Psychology, 123,4, 375-384.[pdf]

Rooijakkers, E.F., Kaminski, J., & Call, J. (2009).  Comparing dogs and great apes in their ability to visually track object transpositions.  Animal Cognition, 12, 6, 789-796. [pdf]

Schrauf, C., & Call, J. (2009) Great apes' performance in discriminating weight and achromatic color. Animal Cognition, 12(4), 567–574. [pdf]

Seed, A.M., Call, J., Emery, N.J., & Clayton, N.S. (2009).  Chimpanzees solve the trap problem when the confound of tool-use is removed.  Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes, 35, 23–34. [pdf]

Zimmermann, F., Zemke, F., Call, J., & Gómez, J.C. (2009).  Orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) and bonobos (Pan paniscus) point to inform a human about the location of a tool.  Animal Cognition, 12, 347–358. [pdf]


2008


Amici, F., Aureli, F., & Call, J. (2008).  Fission-fusion dynamics, behavioral flexibility and inhibitory control in primates.  Current Biology, 18, 1415–1419. [pdf]

Bräuer, J., Call, J., & Tomasello, M. (2008).  Chimpanzees do not take into account what others can hear in a competitive situation.  Animal Cognition, 11, 175–178. [pdf]

Buttelmann, D., Call, J., & Tomasello, M. (2008) Behavioral cues that great apes use to forage for hidden food.  Animal Cognition, 11, 117–128. [pdf]

Buttelmann, D., Carpenter, M., Call, J., & Tomasello, M. (2008).  Rational tool use and tool choice in human infants and great apes.  Child Development, 79, 609–626. [pdf]

Girndt, A., Meier, T., & Call, J. (2008).  Task constraints mask great apes' ability to solve the trap-table task.  Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes, 34, 54–62. [pdf]

Hanus, D., & Call, J. (2008). Chimpanzees infer the location of a reward based on the effect of its weight. [Correspondence]. Current Biology, 18(9), R370–R372. [pdf]

Haun, D., & Call, J. (2008).  Imitation recognition in great apes.  Current Biology, 18, 288–290. [pdf]

Herrmann, E., Wobber, V., & Call, J. (2008).  Great apes' (Pan troglodytes, Pan paniscus, Gorilla gorilla, Pongo pygmaeus) understanding of tool functional properties after limited experience.  Journal of Comparative Psychology, 122, 220–230. [pdf]

Kaminski, J., Call, J., & Tomasello, M. (2008). Chimpanzees know what others know, but not what they believe. Cognition, 109, 224–234. [pdf]

Martin-Ordas, G., Call, J., & Colmenares, F. (2008).  Tubes, tables and traps:  great apes solve two functionally-equivalent trap tasks but show no evidence of transfer across tasks.  Animal Cognition, 11, 423–430. [pdf]

Melis, A., Hare, B., & Tomasello, M. (2008). Do chimpanzees prefer to recruit collaborators who previously preferred them? Animal Behaviour, 76, 951–962. [pdf]

Mendes, N., Rakoczy, H., & Call, J. (2008). Ape metaphysics: Object individuation without language. Cognition, 106(2), 730–749. [pdf]

Okamoto-Barth, S., & Call, J. (2008).  Tracking and inferring spatial rotation by children and great apes.  Developmental Psychology, 44, 1396–1408. [pdf]

Parron, C., Call, J., & Fagot, J. (2008).  Behavioural responses to photographs by pictorially naïve baboons (Papio anubis), gorillas (Gorilla gorilla) and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).  Behavioural Processess, 78, 351–357. [pdf]

Russell, Y.I., Call, J. Dunbar, R.I.M. (2008).  Image scoring in great apes.  Behavioural Processes, 78, 108–111. [pdf]

Tennie, C., Hedwig, D., Call, J., & Tomasello, M. (2008). An experimental study of nettle feeding in captive gorillas. American Journal of Primatology, 70, 584–593. [pdf]

Uher, J. & Asendorpf, J. B. (2008). Personality Assessment in the Great Apes: Comparing Ecologically Valid Behavior Measures, Behavior Ratings, and Adjective Ratings. Journal of Research in Personality, 42, 821-838. [pdf]

Uher, J., Asendorpf, J. B., & Call, J. (2008).  Personality in the behaviour of great apes: Temporal stability, cross-situational consistency, and coherence in response.  Animal Behaviour, 75, 99–112. [pdf]

Uher, J., & Call, J. (2008).  How the Great apes (Pan troglodytes, Pongo pygmaeus, Pan paniscus, and Gorilla gorilla) perform on the reversed reward contingency task II: Transfer to new quantities, long-term retention and the impact of quantity ratios.  Journal of Comparative Psychology, 122, 204–212. [pdf]


2007


Bräuer, J., Call, J. & Tomasello, M. (2007). Chimpanzees Really Know What Others Can See in a Competitive Situation. Animal Cognition, 10, 439-448. [pdf]

Call, J. (2007). Apes Know That Hidden Objects Can Affect the Orientation of Other Objects. Cognition, 105, 1-25. [pdf]

Hanus, D. & Call, J. (2007). Discrete Quantity Judgments in the Great Apes (Pan paniscus, Pan troglodytes, Gorilla gorilla, Pongo pygmaeus): The Effect of Presenting Whole Sets Versus Item-by-Item. Journal of Comparative Psychology, 123, 227-240. [pdf]

Jensen, K., Call, J. & Tomasello, M. (2007) Chimpanzees are rational maximizers in an ultimatum game. Science, 318: 107-109. [pdf]

Jensen, K., Call, J. & Tomasello, M. (2007) Chimpanzees are vengeful but not spiteful. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 104: 13046-13051. [pdf]

Mendes, N., Hanus, D. & Call, J. (2007). Raising the Level: Orangutans Use Water as a Tool. Biology Letters, 3, 453-455. [pdf]

Okamoto-Barth, S., Call, J. & Tomasello, M. (2007). Great Apes' Understanding of Other Individuals' Line of Sight. Psychological Science, 18, 462-468. [pdf]

Rosati, A. G., Stevens, J. R., Hare, B. & Hauser, M. D. (2007). The Evolutionary Origins of Human Patience: Temporal Preferences in Chimpanzees, Bonobos, and Human Adults. Current Biology, 17, 1663-1668. [pdf]

Tomasello, M., Hare, B., Lehmann, H. & Call, J. (2007). Reliance on Head Versus Eyes in the Gaze Following of Great Apes and Human Infants: The Cooperative Eye Hypothesis. Journal of Human Evolution, 52, 314-320. [pdf]


2006


Addessi, E. & Visalberghi, E. (2006). How social influences affect food neophobia in captive chimpanzees: a comparative approach. In T. Matsuzawa, M. Tomonaga & M. Tanaka (Eds). Cognitive development in chimpanzees, (pp. 246-264). New York: Springer. [pdf]

Barth, J. & Call, J. (2006). Tracking the displacement of objects: A series of tasks with Great apes and young children. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes, 32, 239-252. [pdf]

Bräuer, J., Call, J. & Tomasello, M. (2006). Are apes really inequity averse? Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, 273, 3123-3128. [pdf]

Bräuer, J., Kaminski, J., Riedel, J., Call, J. & Tomasello, M. (2006). Making inferences about the location of hidden food: Social dog – Causal ape. Journal of Comparative Psychology, 120, 38-47. [pdf]

Call, J. (2006). Inferences by exclusion in the great apes: the effect of age and species. Animal Cognition, 9, 393-403. [pdf]

Hare, B., Call, J. & Tomasello, M. (2006). Chimpanzees deceive a human competitor by hiding. Cognition, 101, 495-514. [pdf]

Haun, D.B.M.. Call, J., Janzen, G, & Levinson, S.C. (2006). Evolutionary psychology of spatial representations in the Hominidae. Current Biology, 16, 1736-1740. [pdf]

Haun, D.B.M.. Rapold, C.J., Call, J., Janzen, G, & Levinson, S.C. (2006). Cognitive cladistics and cultural override in human spatial cognition. Proceedings of the National Acedemy of Sciences, 103, 17568-17573. [pdf]

Helme, A.E., Call, J., Clayton, N.S. & Emery, N.J. (2006). What do bonobos (Pan paniscus) understand about physical contact? Journal of Comparative Psychology, 120, 294-302. [pdf]

Hermann, E., Melis, A.P. & Tomasello, M. (2006). Apes' use of iconic cues in the object-choice task. Animal Cognition, 9, 118-130. [pdf]

Herrmann, E. & Tomasello, M. (2006). Apes' and children's understanding of cooperative and competitive motives in a communicative situation. Developmental Science, 9, 518–529. [pdf]

Jensen, K., Hare, B., Call, J. & Tomasello, M. (2006). What's in it for me? Self-regard precludes altruism and spite in chimpanzees. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, 273, 1013-1021. [pdf]

Liebal, K., Pika, S., & Tomasello, M. (2006). Gestural communication of orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus). Gesture, 6(1), 1-38. [pdf]

Melis, A.P., Call, J. & Tomasello, M. (2006). Chimpanzees conceal visual and auditory information from others. Journal of Comparative Psychology, 120, 154-162. [pdf]

Melis, A.P., Hare, B. & Tomasello, M. (2006). Engineering cooperation in chimpanzees: tolerance constraints on cooperation. Animal Behaviour, 72, 275-286. [pdf]

Mulcahy , N.J. & Call, J. (2006). Apes save tools for future use. Science, 312, 1038-1040. [pdf]

Mulcahy , N.J. & Call, J. (2006). How great apes perform on a modified trap-tube task. Animal Cognition, 9, 193-199. [pdf]

Scheumann, M. & Call, J. (2006). Sumatran orangutans (Pongo abelii) and a yellow-cheeked crested gibbon (Nomascus gabriellae) know what is where. International Journal of Primatology, 27, 575-602. [pdf]

Suda, C. & Call, J. (2006). What does an intermediate success rate mean? An analysis of a Piagetian liquid conservation task in the great apes. Cognition, 99, 53-71. [pdf]

Tennie, C., Call, J. & Tomasello, M. (2006). Push or pull: imitation versus emulation in human children and great apes. Ethology, 112, 1159-1169. [pdf]

Vlamings, P.H.J.M., Uher, J. & Call, J. (2006). How the Great apes (Pan troglodytes, Pongo pygmaeus, Pan paniscus, and Gorilla gorilla) perform on the reversed contingency task: The effects of food quantity and food visibility. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes, 32, 60-70. [pdf]

Warneken, F. & Tomasello, M. (2006) Altruistic helping in human infants and young chimpanzees. Science, 311, 1301-1303. [pdf]


2005


Bräuer, J., Call, J. & Tomasello, M. (2005). All great ape species follow gaze to distant locations and around barriers . Journal of Comparative Psychology, 119, 145-154. [pdf]

Call, J. (2005). The self and the other: a missing link in comparative social cognition . In Terrace, H. & Metcalfe, J. (eds.). The Evolution of Consciousness in Animals and Humans (pp. 321-341). New York: Oxford University Press.

Mulcahy , N.J. , Call, J. & Dunbar, R.I.M. (2005). Gorillas and orangutans encode relevant problem features in a tool-using task. Journal of Comparative Psychology, 119, 23-32. [pdf]

Suda, C. & Call, J. (2005). Piagetian conservation of discrete quantities in bonobos (Pan paniscus), chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), and orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus). Animal Cognition, 8, 220-235. [pdf]

Tomasello, M. & Carpenter, M. (2005). The emergence of social cognition in three young chimpanzees. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 70 (1, Serial No. 279). [pdf]


2004


Call, J. (2004). Inferences about the location of food in the great apes (Pan paniscus, Pan troglodytes, Gorilla gorilla, Pongo pygmaeus). Journal of Comparative Psychology, 118, 232-241. [pdf]

Call, J., Hare, B.H., Carpenter, M. & Tomasello, M. (2004). ‘ Unwilling’ versus ‘Unable’: Chimpanzees' understanding of human intentional action? Developmental Science, 7, 488-498. [pdf]

Hare, B. & Tomasello, M. (2004). Chimpanzees are more skilful in competitive than in cooperative cognitive tasks. Animal Behaviour, 68, 571-581. [pdf]

Kaminski, J., Call, J. & Tomasello, M. (2004). Body orientation and face orientation: two factors controlling apes’ begging behavior from humans. Animal Cognition, 7, 216-223. [pdf]

Liebal, K., Pika, S., Call, J. & Tomasello, M. (2004). To move or not to move: how apes alter the attentional states of humans when begging for food. Interaction Studies, 5, 199-219. [pdf]

Suda, C. & Call, J. (2004). Piagetian liquid conservation in the great apes. Journal of Comparative Psychology, 118 , 265-279. [pdf]